Posts/August, 2012/

The Last Days in Mexico City: Polanco, Museo Soumaya, La Feria Amusement Park, Museo del Chopo, and Mercado Merced

Friday, August 31st, 2012

On Tuesday, J and I went on an epic all day adventure from Reforma through the “ritzy” neighborhood of Polanco to find the Museo Soumaya. Along the way, we passed fortified houses, lots of colorful businesses, and fountains in various states of squirting.

image
Mobile snack dispenser.
image
Hija.
image
The only candy I’ve seen that includes a packet of hot sauce: SKWINKLES.
image
Not sure I trust this overpass.
image
Driveway.
image
W.
image
No parking on this sliver of sidewalk.
image
I wish I understood Spanish better.
image
Blocky building.
image
Hand painted window repair truck.
image
Low rise bench.
image
Polanco pathway.
image
Tree trimmer acrobats.
image
Fountain.
image
The golden A frame roof of Iglesia de San Ignacio de Loyola.
image
Tile detail.
image
Interior colored by stained glass.
image
The weird hotel across the street. Basically someone could walk up the sloping side all the way to the top.
image
Truck accepting all sorts of scrap.
image
Practical joke?
image
Sink hole.
image
Nature finds a way.
image
Um…
image
The fence by GM’s headquarters.
image
A wheat flour factory.
image
Track switch signal.

Museo Soumaya is a free, private museum that opened in 2011. It’s owned by the Carlos Slim Foundation, basically the shell for the wealthiest man in Latin America. The new building was designed by Mexican architect Fernando Romero, who by coincidence I’m sure, is married to Carlos’s daughter.

The museum holds works by many of the best known European artists from the 15th to the 20th century, as well as a metric shit-ton of Rodin and Dali sculptures. The Rodins are casts, but the Dalis are the surreal deal.

image
Museo Soumaya.
image
J at the entrance.
image
The ground floor.
image
The sculpture garden on the top floor. Mostly Rodins, though this view is of a collection on Dali.
image
Delicious food court flautas at a nearby mall.

After lunch in a nearby mall, we walked eastward through some run down streets to the nearest Metro station. The southward train brought us near Chapultepec Park, and we found an inefficient walkway across an under-construction highway.

Our destination was La Feria Chapultepec Mágico, an amusement park that opened in 1964. For most of its life, it was operated by the Mexican government.

On a weekday, the park was nearly empty. No lines, no waiting. We purchased the basic passes for 90 pesos. These tickets excluded the majority of the bigger, funner rides. But those could be added for around 20-30 pesos each at ticket counters inside the park. In hindsight, we should have bought the 150 peso ultimate pass.

J and I rode go-karts with the track to ourselves, a g-forceful hip smashing ride called El Ratón Loco, high-flying swings, bumper cars, and a pee-smelling Jules Verne ride.

My other couldn’t leave without riding the elephant in the room: the Montaña Rusa. I sat in the shade and tried to follow her as the rattled along the undulating track.

image
Come on ride the wheat train.
image
Blue wall.
image
Crossing the highway.
image
Our walkway.
image
A defunct pedestrian bridge.
image
Wooden roller coaster.
image
Spiral.
image
El Raton Loco, the crazy mouse of a ride that slammed me to the sides of the spinning teacup that hurled on the tracks.
image
Flume splash zone.
image
Another view of old woody.
image
Walkway.
image
Part of Lago Mayor de Chapultepec. Home of koi and some crazy looking fowl.
image
Backyard altar.
image
Colorful scene.
image
Olympic logo run amok.
image
Delicious tacos al pastor with limes and various salsas in the background.
image
Trees on a stroll.

On Wednesday we took the Metro to find Museo del Chopo. This building was originally made for a World’s Fair in Germany at the turn of last century, and was brought to Mexico soon after. It was reassembled.

The most renovation converted it into a university gallery and study space. While the exterior was unchanged, the massive interior was filled with a multi-floor internal structure in a cool combination of old an new.

We left the museum and walked around the area before taking one last stroll through Mercado Merced to see if we had missed anything on our prior trip.

image
Looking up.
image
A modern addition.
image
Empty lounge.
image
Nik the Dick and J DAWG JAMMY FRESH.
image
Monumento A la Revolución.
image
I see you you, duct.
image
Alley in a small Chinatown.
image
Soda.
image
Cat and colorful walls.
image
This will block all cars.
image
Gas.
image
Street near Mercado Merced.
image
Brushed aluminum torta kiosk.
image
Cool hand painted logos.
image
Loading zone.
image
Village size bags of chips.
image
Herbs.
image
Empty bee hives.
image
Dead on the job.
image
J entering the kitchenware wonderland.
image
Electronics near the subway entrance.

Due to the rougher neighborhood and hot weather on Wednesday, I was not in a photographic mood. I guess after two weeks in the place, once exotic scenery starts to feel normal.

That night, J and I walked to Zona Rosa and sat outside at a cerveseria, enjoyed an obscure beer, michelada, and multiple tacos of shrimp and pastor. Our time in Mexico City was winding to and end, and we soaked in the noisy street like the last few pages of a good book.

Archives for August, 2012
Page 1 of 612345-Last »